Tag Archives: Arizona

Stagecoach Trails #3357 Flattop Mountain

Update: 5/17/19 Price Reduced Now Just $34,900

Once in a while, we list a property that’s not only different from the typical parcel here, but is extraordinary. Stagecoach Trails Parcel #3357 is one of those.

Ding Ding Ding! A rare opportunity to own a piece of Flattop Mountain, a local Yucca landmark*Deceiving from the road, this property rises from a magnificent desert arroyo to some incredible vistas and lovely spots, and on to the base of Flattop*

Rolling mini mountains, and the secret hideaways within*A world of it’s own, and an unknown treasure just out of sight*Rugged, rolling, and rocky loaded with character*Starry nights, and beautiful vistas*

Great location, not too far from town, but still loaded with Joshua trees, ocotillo & a wide variety of desert flora*Nice*Flowers everywhere*Giant rock boulders, and quartz outcroppings*Barrel cactus galore, many growing in unique and delightful ways*Hualapai, Black, and Mohave Mountain vistas*

100% Water & Mineral Rights*Flattop towers over all*Geology & topography*Could be a wonderful desert park*This one is so cool, but my wife says we already have enough land*You really shouldn’t wait…


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Land Special of the Week

Update: Pending

Well, that was quick. Told you it was great value!

Wow! Every once in a while, a really good value appears at Stagecoach Trails. It’s even nicer when it’s our own listing.

This week’s Special of the Week is a brand new listing at 19165 South Goldmine Rd. (Stagecoach Trails Parcel 7) offered at just $49,900. What makes this is amazing value is not just the prime location east of Alamo Rd., but this parcel already has an existing septic system and well. It’s practically turn key for your RV, or to start building that dream off grid home.

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This Month in Arizona – 1997

Here’s an article about the mysterious lights spotted in 1997 in Arizona:

Phoenix Lights – 1997 The Phoenix Lights (sometimes called the “Lights over Phoenix”) were a series of widely sighted unidentified flying objects observed in the skies over Arizona, Nevada in the United States, and Sonora, Mexico on Thursday, March 13, 1997.Lights of varying descriptions were seen by thousands of people between 19:30 and 22:30 MST, in a space of about 300 miles (480 km), from the Nevada line, through Phoenix, to the edge of Tucson.  There were allegedly two distinct events involved in the incident: a triangular formation of lights seen to pass over the state, and a series of stationary lights seen in the Phoenix area. The United States Air Force identified the second group of lights as flares dropped by A-10 Warthog aircraft that were on training exercises at the Barry Goldwater Range in southwest Arizona.Witnesses claim to have observed a huge carpenter’s square-shaped UFO, containing five spherical lights or possibly light-emitting engines. Fife Symington, the governor at the time, was one witness to this incident; he later called the object “otherworldly.”The lights were reported to have reappeared in 2007 and 2008, but these events were quickly attributed to (respectively) military flares dropped by fighter aircraft at Luke Air Force Base and flares attached to helium balloons released by a civilian.

Source: Phoenix Lights – 1997 – MUFON (Click to read More)

Frequent Visitors

We’re blessed with abundant wildlife at Stagecoach Trails. We have coyotes, javelina, bobcats, mountain lions (closer to the mountains,) deer, fox, and a million quail.

I’ve seen a lion only once, but coyotes are almost daily, and the quail will come excitedly whenever we’ve been away for a few days. They want us to top off the three bird feeders that we have hung from a Joshua Tree out front.

Today we’ll spotlight the bobcats. (More pictures if you click “more” below.)

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Wildflower Season Soon

It’s been a wet year so far. Today we received a light rain. On top of the rains of January & February and the upcoming rain on Friday, we are looking at what may be a rather good wildflower season.

In a perfect year, we would receive a decent soaking at least every two weeks from September to March. In most years, this just doesn’t happen, and this year was no exception.

We did get some decent rains in October, but November and most of December were devoid of any rain. There’s still hope though, and the relatively moist run that we’ve so far this season will really help this year. (At least one can dream.)

In 2005, we had a particularly wet year. The groundwater was so abundant that water ran across Alamo Rd. in spots for months. There were “seasonal” streams that had been dry for years that suddenly became babbling brooks. It was a verdant green time, and the desert was simply splendid.

Will 2019 be another stunner? Time will tell

 

 

Are We Losing the Grand Canyon?

“IF YOU BREAK loose here, you can’t stop. You’re going into the abyss,” barks Rich Rudow. Normally he is unflappable, but as he knows too well, this is no place to let down one’s guard. We’re on a cliff roughly 3,500 feet above the Colorado River at the tip of the Great Thumb Mesa, a spectacular formation that thrusts out from the South Rim of the Grand Canyon like the bow of an immense ship. It is one of the canyon’s most remote spots, rarely seen even by the most hard-core backpackers. If you come this far out on the Thumb, there is no way to get down to the river without climbing gear, and the dwindling food in your pack won’t allow you to make the eight-day trek back the way you came. You have to move forward.

Click the link to read the whole article, including pictures.

Source: Are We Losing the Grand Canyon? Via National Geographic

Frequent Visitors

Javelina are frequent visitors here on the ranch. We used to store birdseed on the front porch in a closed 5 gallon container. One night I heard a sound on the porch, and when I went out I discovered the overturned container and heard a shuffling noise in the darkness.

I cleaned up the seed as much as possible, but our porch is made of flagstone, and there were still quite a few left in the cracks and crevices.

I waited for a short while, and sure enough, the javelina returned to finish his snack. By morning there wasn’t a seed remaining.

Here’s some daytime shots:

The House of Cards

Remember all those sub-prime mortgages that blew up in 2007 and popped the housing bubble? The widely-held consensus is that millions of them were foreclosed as housing markets cratered. Since then, the remaining ones have been quietly disappearing as markets recovered.

Here is the problem: That is just a fairy tale. The truth is these mortgages are still dangerous and could soon undermine the housing recovery.

Source: The Burning Platform

Arizona History

Arizona, constituent state of the United States of America. Arizona is the sixth largest state in the country in terms of area. Its population has always been predominantly urban, particularly since the mid-20th century, when urban and suburban areas began growing rapidly at the expense of the countryside. Some scholars believe that the state’s name comes from a Basque phrase meaning “place of oaks,” while others attribute it to a Tohono O’odham (Papago) Indian phrase meaning “place of the young (or little) spring.” Arizona achieved statehood on February 14, 1912, the last of the 48 conterminous United States to be admitted to the union.

Source: Arizona | Geography, Facts, Map, & History | Britannica.com

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