Tag Archives: Arizona

Land Special – Stagecoach Trails 710 Billy the Kid

Just $18,900 – Possible Owner Financing, Call Now

Lovely Parcel in easy to get to location in Stagecoach Trails near primary road, Jesse James.

Nice vegetation: Joshua Trees, Ocotillo, Barrel Cactus, and loads of wildflowers. Wide panoramic views of the Hualapai, Mohave & Black Mountains. Crystal clear night skies for your stargazing pleasure, and truly dark skies!

Get to where you’ve always wanted to be – the beautiful high desert of Northwest Arizona. Big 40 acres Surveyed, staked. 100% Water & mineral rights.

Come join the growing community of Yucca Arizona, where Grand Mohave desert meets blue Sonoran skies. Close for visitors from California, and nearby Lake Havasu City and Kingman are a low stress drive away. What are you waiting for?

See more pictures: Continue reading Land Special – Stagecoach Trails 710 Billy the Kid

Arizona History – July 9th

Thursday, July 9

On this date in 1857, the first mail to go through Arizona was carried on horseback from San Antonio, Texas, by James E. Mason. It arrived in Tucson on Aug. 19 after being delayed by American Indian attacks east of El Paso, Texas.

On this date in 1901, the city of Williams was incorporated.

On this date in 1952, Coronado National Forest was established.

(Photo : Coronado National Forest)

Arizona History – June 16th

Tuesday, June 16

On this date in 1888, the entire downtown section of Holbrook was destroyed by a fire that originated in a wool warehouse. The town was quickly rebuilt, however, with even larger and more substantial buildings.

On this date in 1896, the new electric plant at the Yuma Territorial Prison was destroyed by fire.

On this date in 1910, the Tucson Fire Department’s horse drawn wagons raced through city streets at 9 p.m. in response to an alarm. Suddenly a man appeared in the middle of the street waving a red lantern. The drivers veered to one side, and learned later they had barely avoided plunging into a 6-foot ditch which had been dug across the street for a sewer line.

On this date in 1913, the establishment of an aviation school in Phoenix, the first in the Southwest, was announced. The school’s instructor, Jacques Neyvatte, guaranteed to make students expert fliers in six weeks.

On this date in 1988, Gov. Evan Mecham and his brother, Willard, were acquitted of criminal charges of concealing a $350,000 campaign loan. The acquittal came two months after Mecham was removed from office by a State Senate conviction in an impeachment trial on charges of obstruction of justice and misuse of state funds.

Arizona History – June 6

Saturday, June 6

On this date in 1851, Camp Independence was established on the east bank of the Colorado River near its junction with the Gila River under the command of Lt. Thomas W. Sweeny. Camp Independence was replaced by Fort Yuma in December, 1851.

On this date in 1903, Gov. Alexander Brodie ordered the Arizona Rangers to Morenci and Clifton where miners were striking.

On this date in 1933, the first concrete was poured at Hoover Dam.

On this date in 1936, the first barrel of tequila made in the United States was produced at the San Andres distillery in Nogales.

Arizona History – May 27

Wednesday, May 27

On this date in 1896, the first commencement of Phoenix Union High School was held at the Phoenix Opera House. Keynote speaker John E. Merriam talked on “What Electrical Science is Doing for the World.”

On this date in 1910, it was announced that Picacho Mine, which had sat idle in the Cababi Mountains for many years, was to reopen.

Arizona History – May 26

Tuesday, May 26

On this date in 1881, the first telephone office was established in Tucson.

On this date in 1894, the city of Flagstaff was incorporated.

On this date in 1909, the Pima County Court dismissed a 22-year-old murder indictment against Geronimo.

On this date in 1910, the Pima County Board of Supervisors ruled they would not license saloons in mining camps that had no police force.

On this date in 1915, the first furnace was put into operation at the Clarkdale Smelter to smelt the ore from the United Verde mines at Jerome.

On this date in 1930, President Herbert Hoover signed the proclamation creating Sunset Crater National Monument.

Land Special of the Week Parcel L1A Carrow

Update : 7/18/2020 Pending Sale

1+ acre piece of desert beauty where the Mohave desert meets blue Sonoran skies.

Lush desert vegetation: Joshua trees, Palo Christie, beavertail, hedgehog, and a plethora of wildflowers.

Starry starry nights. Basic dirt driveway, ready for your RV or off grid home. Stunning views in all directions.

Milky Way nights, and gorgeous Spring wildflowers. Close to miles and miles of Federal Lands not only on all four sides of this subdivision, but nearby too are thousands of acres for all your off road adventures. Peace and quiet, just what the doctor ordered.

Pretty, affordable, and just waiting for you. Don’t miss this value!

Owner/Broker (I know, those darn brokers,  really I’m one of the good guys,) and it is a great price.

Continue reading Land Special of the Week Parcel L1A Carrow

Arizona History – May 12

Tuesday, May 12

On this date in 1886, fire destroyed the Grand Central pumphouse in Tombstone, causing the mines to flood and shutting down all mining operations.

On this date in 1887, the Tombstone Epitaph reported that a volcano had erupted in the Dragoon Mountains following an earthquake. On this date in 1897, Ed Schiefflin, discoverer of the Tombstone silver mines, died.

On this date in 1913, Herbert Brown, who had come to Arizona in 1873, engaged in lumbering in the Santa Rita Mountains and in the mercantile business in Tucson, died. Brown was the owner of the Tucson Citizen and the Tucson Post newspapers and in 1902 was appointed warden of the Yuma Prison, and operated the Gondolfo Hotel there.

On this date in 1924, Evan Mecham, the first governor in Arizona to be impeached, was born in Duchesne, Utah.

Source: Arizona History May 10-16 | Arizona News | US News

Arizona History – May 11

Monday, May 11

On this date in 1889, a band of masked men ambushed Maj. J.W. Wham and his military escort carrying a $26,000 army payroll to Fort Thomas. The payroll was stolen and eight soldiers were wounded.

On this date in 1910, the Maricopa-Phoenix train was held up about 8 miles (13 kilometers) from Maricopa. Two bandits relieved all the passengers of their valuables and one passenger was struck over the head with a revolver.

On this date in 1910, work began on the north-south territorial highway out of Prescott.

On this date in 1934, Tucson’s first city hall building, which was built in 1881, was destroyed by fire.

Source: Arizona History May 10-16 | Arizona News | US News

Arizona History – May 10

Events in Arizona history in the week of May 10-16 included a fire that destroyed Tucson’s first city hall building in 1881 and the authorization of the Salt River Project by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation in 1903.

SUNDAY, MAY 10

On this date in 1863, the Pioneer Mining District on Lynx Creek was formed after five members of the party led by Cap. Joseph Walker discovered gold along Lynx Creek.

On this date in 1872, the Tully-Ochoa wagon train was attacked in Canyon del Oro by 300 Indians. Five men were killed and many more wounded, mules were stolen and the wagons burned.

On this date in 1913, the town of Miami was barely saved from total disaster when a fire — started in the Arizona Eastern freight depot — destroyed the station, a warehouse and several freight cars, and damaged hotels and residences in the area.

On this date in 1928, the University of Arizona Dean of Women decided that women must wear stockings, and could not appear on campus in abbreviated costumes.

Source: Arizona History May 10-16 | Arizona News | US News