Steelers QB Ben Roethlisberger Selling Pennsylvania Mansion for $2.3M

Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger is selling a lavish suburban estate outside Pittsburgh for $2,295,000.

The family home in Hampton, PA, is empty at the moment, which might be why he was motivated to knock more than $400,000 off the asking price in June.

More than a house, it is “the ultimate entertaining complex,” the listing notes. The veteran QB purchased the 5-acre property in 2006 for $2,220,000.

Since then, his life has changed: He got married in 2011 and now has three children. He and his family have reportedly moved into a new home they built elsewhere in the area. So they’re ready to move on from this eight-bedroom, seven-plus-bathroom home, despite it being loaded with all sorts of amenities for fun and relaxation.

Source: Steelers QB Ben Roethlisberger Selling Pennsylvania Mansion for $2.3M | realtor.com®

Discover 20 Self-Sowing Flowers! | Old Farmer’s Almanac

Many flowers reseed themselves! Here’s a list of over 20 annual and perennial flowers that you can plant once and enjoy for years. And if you are busy deadheading your flowers—stop! Take a look at the seed heads you are cutting off.

Let some of the seed heads ripen until they turn brown and split open. These seed capsules are like salt shakers full of tiny seeds. Scatter the seeds anywhere you would like them to grow or just let them drop where they are.

Next spring, keep a sharp eye out for the seedlings when weeding. Some may be slow to emerge. If there are more than you want you don’t have to keep them all. Thin them out to allow enough space for the plants to fully develop. Relocate the extras or pot them up to share with friends.

Gardening-advice/discover-20-self-sowing-flowers 

Via Old Farmers Almanac

 

August Real Estate Update

It’s the dog days of August, we can see the two dogs in the morning skies, that is Canis Major & Canus Minor. Canis Major has the brightest star visible from earth, Sirius.

This month we would normally be shuffling papers, and trying to get chores done before the heat gets too oppressive, like say by 8:00 am. Surprisingly, this year the calls and emails have continued through the summer, which has been mercifully nicer temperature wise too. We’ll see if sales follow; one can always hope. We have had a noticeably better year  overall with a good positive trend that we’ve needed here.

The monsoon rains are very late this year. We had rain for about a minute one night last week, but that’s been about it. The humidity is higher now though. We had been 6-10% humidity most of June and early July, but now it’s more typically 25-35%. This weekend will see temperatures a high as 111 degrees in Yucca. We’ll be a precious few degrees cooler where we are, but it’s hot!

I believe that Yucca is the last great bargain in the West. We’re relatively close to smaller, but centrally located small cities, and those (Kingman, Lake Havasu City, and Bullhead City) are becoming pricier as we see an influx of new residents. While it’s 2-2 1/2 hours to Las Vegas, that leaves many possibilities for visits from family and friends. California is just 20 miles from Santa Fe Ranch Rd., and one can be at the beaches in a little over 5 hours (avoid rush hour!)

The opportunity today I believe is in trying to extend infrastructure (as in grid power,) or by finding good property and adding septic, well and even a home.

There is a need, but many don’t have the wherewithal or physical capability to take on a home building project. To me it’s a young man’s dream, but the builders do work very hard, and are often subject to the whims of the market as we’ve seen over the years.

Considerable electric and phone infrastructure already exists around Yucca, and one can easily envision more development. Sun City, Yucca? Don’t laugh. We have water, power, rail, interstate, and thousands of acres of inexpensive (relatively) land.

Meanwhile, as we’re more than 20 miles out, I don’t think we’ll have a Circle K at the corner any time soon.

 

Make Emergency Candles from Bacon Grease

…Nothing beats a flashlight or an emergency candle in case the power goes out, but what are you going to do when there’s no more juice in that lantern and the last piece of flick died out like the ambitions and desires of a crestfallen lover?

Make some more, of course, because that’s we preppers are good at. In today’s article, I’m going to show you a fast way to create 24-hour emergency candles by harnessing the raw power of your favorite dish – bacon.

Yup, you’ve read that right. Bacon’s not only great for breakfast, but can also be used to make portable and highly efficient light sources. So, enough chit chat! Let’s take a look at how bacon candles are made.

Source: How To Turn Bacon Grease Into Emergency Candles – Daily Prepper News

Save Your Seeds, Save Your Life

We are told that everything begins with seed. Everything ends with it, too. As a chef I can tell you that your meal will be incalculably more delicious if I’m cooking with good ingredients.

But until that afternoon I’d rarely considered how seed influences — determines, really — not only the beginning and the end of the food chain, but also every link in between. The tens of thousands of rows surrounding me owed their brigade-like uniformity to the operating instructions embedded in the seed.

That uniformity allows for large-scale monoculture, which in turn determines the size and model of the combine tractor needed to efficiently harvest such a load. (“Six hundred horsepower — needs a half-mile just to turn her around,” joked the farmer sitting next to me.)

Satellite information, beamed into the tractor’s computer, makes it possible to farm such an expanse with scientific precision.

The type of seed also dictates the fertilizer, pesticide and fungicide regimen, sold by the same company as part of the package, requiring a particular planter and sprayer (40 feet and 140 feet wide, respectively) and producing a per-acre yield that is startling, and startlingly easy to predict.

It is as if the seed is a toy that comes with a mile-long list of component parts you’re required to purchase to make it function properly.

We think that the behemoths of agribusiness known as Big Food control the food system from up high — distribution, processing and the marketplace muscling everything into position. But really it is the seed that determines the system, not the other way around.

The seeds in my palm optimized the farm for large-scale machinery and chemical regimens; they reduced the need for labor; they elbowed out the competition (formally known as biodiversity). In other words, seeds are a blueprint for how we eat.

We should be alarmed by the current architects. Just 50 years ago, some 1,000 small and family-owned seed companies were producing and distributing seeds in the United States; by 2009, there were fewer than 100. Thanks to a series of mergers and acquisitions over the last few years, four multinational agrochemical firms — Corteva, ChemChina, Bayer and BASF — now control over 60 percent of global seed sales.

Source: Opinion | Save Our Food. Free the Seed. – The New York Times

How to grow your own wellness garden

Besides food, one can grow many herbs that are useful medicine. Here’s a few. Be sure to click for more info.

Modern medicine owes a lot to the plant kingdom, from the treatment of heart disease to lung disorders. But plants can be useful for minor ailments and everyday self-care, too.

Growing for wellness is going mainstream. A recent survey by Wyevale Garden Centres found that more than two thirds of British gardeners consider the health and wellbeing properties of a plant before they buy it.

At Chelsea Physic Garden, a Food is Medicine Trail starts this month to highlight plants you can grow as tonics, pick-me-ups and other soothing remedies to handle the stresses of modern life.

Many are surprisingly easy to grow, even in limited city spaces. We asked Chelsea Physic Garden’s head of plant collections, Nell Jones, to share her tips for the best “wellbeing” plants to grow at home.

Source: How to grow your own wellness garden: from peppermint to turmeric easy-to-grow plants that will help with minor ailments and wellbeing | Homes and Property

Arcosanti today – the lost city

There’s a giant contradiction in the middle of the Arizona desert: an experimental city designed for thousands that now contains only a few dozen inhabitants.

For nearly five decades, a group called the Cosanti Foundation has been working to build a city that would inspire a new future of urban design. Today, the project is only 5% complete.

Called Arcosanti, the city was envisioned by Italian architect Paolo Soleri, whose dream was to create an advanced urban laboratory where everyday activities could be powered by Earth’s natural resources. Soleri dubbed his vision an “urban implosion” — referring to design that would promote density and reduce sprawl by eliminating cars and roads. (Ironically, the easiest way to reach the development in the Sonoran Desert is by car.)

Instead of light bulbs, rooms would be illuminated by the sun’s natural rays, and instead of air conditioning, vegetation would provide natural shade.

Source: In Arizona, the Arcosanti desert utopia has become a kind of commune – Business Insider

We drove by without stopping one time. It’s in a beautiful area, but not much has changed over its’ 50 year history. Check out the article…