Arizona History – April 9th

Friday, April 9th

On this date in 1910, Frank Aley, a mineralogist, humorist and writer, known by the pen name of “Mescal,” died at Calumet Hospital in Douglas. He had apparently been fatally injured in a fall from a horse.

On this day in 1920, several people were injured and a number of buildings were damaged or destroyed when the powder magazine at the United Verde Mine at Jerome exploded.

On this day in 1926, a tornado ripped through east Phoenix, leveling six homes.

On this day in 1943, Sharlot Hall, a Prescott historian knows as Arizona’s poet-laureate, died.

(Photo : Sharlot Hall)

Arizona History – April 8th

Thursday, April 8th

On this date in 1893, the governor of Arizona Territory commuted the sentences of two editors of Arizona newspapers, convicted of criminal libel, from five days at the Yuma state penitentiary to five days in the Pima County Jail.

On this date in 1910, farmers and stockmen of the Prescott area complained of packs of wild dogs killing livestock. The dogs were said to be descendants of domestic dogs which had run away to live in the mountains around Prescott with the wolves, and were very large and vicious.

On this date in 1914, four troopers of the U.S. 9th Cavalry were wounded on American soil by wild bullets as Sonora state troops and Mexican Federals fought for possession of Naco.

On this date in 1920, the Arizona Livestock Commission warned that stockmen faced a possible loss of more than $1 million unless the disease of blackleg could be brought under control promptly.

Keeping Up to Date

2021 Newspeak Translator:

conspiracy theorist‘ = anyone who does research

anti-science‘ = questioning the mainstream narrative

killing grandma‘ = opposing lockdowns, mask mandates, or house arrests

anti-vaxxer‘ = anyone who has questions or concerns around THIS vaccine

ZUBY: (@ZubyMusic) April 5, 2021

Arizona History – April 7th

Wednesday, April 7th

On this date in 1913, the State Board of Control ordered that Gov. George W.P. Hunt’s official car be taken from him and announced that he could pay his own transportation or walk just like everyone else.

On this date in 1920, The Arizona Daily Star announced that Lee Parker, trapper for the U.S. Biological Survey, had trapped seven mountain lions in the Canelo Hills near Patagonia. On that same day, another trapper shot four lions in the Catalina Mountains.

 

Arizona History – April 6th

Tuesday, April 6th

On this date in 1916, Phoenix Union High School and Globe High School were the first in the state to be accepted by the North Central Association of Accredited Schools and Colleges.

On this date in 1920, the funeral of Robert N. Leatherwood was held. Leatherwood was a former mayor of Tucson and Pima County sheriff. He had helped locate mines in the Quijotoa District, operated a livery stable and planted peach and apple orchards in the Catalina Mountains.

On this date in 1920, Mexican strikers abandoned a freight train loaded with tomatoes 25 miles (40 kilometers) south of Nogales, Mexico, and every truck in the twin towns was requisitioned to salvage the freight and unload it in Nogales, Arizona.

On this date in 1992, Donald Eugene Harding was executed by lethal gas at the state prison in Florence for the 1980 murders of two businessmen in Phoenix. Harding, 43, was the first person executed in the state since Manuel Silvas in 1976 and was the last to be executed while the gas chamber was the official execution method.

(Photo : Donald Eugene Harding)

Grow Your Own Ginger

We’ll definitely have to try this, there’s nothing like fresh ginger.

While it’s true that ginger is a tropical plant, it is possible to grow it outdoors in most climates. The catch is that it can only survive in temperatures 50 degrees Fahrenheit or above. That means that in some parts of the country—like certain areas in Florida, California and Arizona—ginger can be a year-round crop.

But the rest of the U.S. isn’t completely left out in the cold: according to Sher, it is possible to grow ginger is cooler climates—the season is just shorter. In these areas, she says that it’s best to plant ginger after (what appears to be) the last frost of the spring

.Although it takes around eight months for a ginger plant to reach its full potential, in the cooler parts of the country, you can harvest the young ginger after three or four months. Or if you want to keep the party going, just bring the pots in for the winter.

Source: How to Grow Ginger at Home

(Click on the link for the full article)

Arizona History – April 5th

Monday, April 5th

On this date in 1898, the mining camp of Congress was destroyed by fire, resulting in two deaths and $50,000 worth of property damage.

On this date in 1899, the town of Thatcher was incorporated.

On this date in 1910, the Territorial Board of Control accepted bids and ordered construction of the Pioneers’ Home in Prescott.

On this date in 1919, a Victory Fair opened in Tucson to celebrate the end of World War I. A squadron of military airplanes flew from San Diego to present an aerial exhibition, and troops of the 10th Cavalry from Fort Huachuca marched in the parade.

(Photos : Thatcher, Arizona)

 

Arizona History – April 4th

Sunday, April 4th

On this date in 1825, Charles T. Hayden, founder of Tempe and father of Sen. Carl T. Hayden, was born.

On this date in 1917, fire caused by a kerosene lamp destroyed all but two buildings in the mining town of Ajo. Citizens saved a phonograph from a burning store and played “There’ll Be a Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight” as the city burned.

On this date in 1930, the Arizona State School for the Deaf and Blind was closed for lack of funds. The school’s teachers were owed three months’ back pay.

On this date in 1988, Gov. Evan Mecham became the first governor in Arizona history to be removed from office through impeachment. Mecham was convicted by the state Senate of obstruction of justice and misuse of state funds.

On this date in 1988, Rose Mofford became Arizona’s first woman governor following the impeachment conviction of Gov. Evan Mecham.

(Photo : Rose Mofford)

Arizona History – April 3rd

Saturday, April 3rd

On this date in 1904, a leaking gas main exploded in a Prescott saloon and gambling house, injuring four people.

On this date in 1919, Maricopa County, not including the city of Phoenix, stood alone in the rejection of Daylight Savings Time. Other cities and counties gave up the battle and moved their clocks forward an hour, but Maricopa County supervisors insisted there would be no surrender.

On this date in 1927, the Horse Mesa Dam and Power Plant went into operation and began earning $3,200 a day for the Salt River Valley Users Association.

Quotes of the Day

“The last stage but one of every civilisation, is characterised by the forced political unification of its constituent parts, into a single greater whole.”

Arnold Toynbee

“There is no difference in principle… between the economic philosophy of Nazism, socialism, communism, and fascism and that of the American welfare state and regulated economy.”

Jacob G. Hornberger

“I’ll show you politics in America. Here it is, right here. ‘I think the puppet on the right shares my beliefs.’ ‘I think the puppet on the left is more to my liking.’ ‘Hey, wait a minute, there’s one guy holding out both puppets!’”

Bill Hicks

“What governments call international monetary cooperation is concerted action for the sake of credit expansion.”

Ludwig von Mises

Source: The Burning Platform