Category Archives: History

Arizona History – June 5

Friday, June 5

On this date in 1871, Armijo, one of the principal chiefs of the Navajo Nation died.

On this date in 1928, bids were opened for the construction of the North Rim Road of the Grand Canyon.

On this date in 1928, Northern Arizona State Teachers College at Flagstaff graduated the largest class in its history as President Grady Gammage presented 81 certificates.

On this date in 1996, Winslow’s temperature hit 100 degrees, breaking the record of 96 for the day set back in 1957.

(I was here that day, having arrived just the day before to monsoon rains, and my makeshift roof had blown off. It was hot, and I wondered if I had made a mistake leaving a stable career & family behind in Ohio. I can say now that it was the right move.)

Arizona History – June 1

Monday, June 1

On this date in 1868, the eighth and final treaty between the Navajo Nation and the United States was concluded at Ft. Sumner, New Mexico. This treaty included the establishment of the present Navajo Indian Reservation.

On this date in 1906, the mule-drawn street car made its last run to the gates of the University of Arizona beside the electric car which had gone into operation five days before.

On this date in 1910, fire destroyed the stable of the Pioneer Transfer Co. in Phoenix. Four horses were burned to death.

Arizona History – May 27

Wednesday, May 27

On this date in 1896, the first commencement of Phoenix Union High School was held at the Phoenix Opera House. Keynote speaker John E. Merriam talked on “What Electrical Science is Doing for the World.”

On this date in 1910, it was announced that Picacho Mine, which had sat idle in the Cababi Mountains for many years, was to reopen.

Arizona History – May 26

Tuesday, May 26

On this date in 1881, the first telephone office was established in Tucson.

On this date in 1894, the city of Flagstaff was incorporated.

On this date in 1909, the Pima County Court dismissed a 22-year-old murder indictment against Geronimo.

On this date in 1910, the Pima County Board of Supervisors ruled they would not license saloons in mining camps that had no police force.

On this date in 1915, the first furnace was put into operation at the Clarkdale Smelter to smelt the ore from the United Verde mines at Jerome.

On this date in 1930, President Herbert Hoover signed the proclamation creating Sunset Crater National Monument.

Arizona History – May 25

Monday, May 25

On this date in 1892, the Arizona Medical Association was organized in Phoenix. It was incorporated on June 16, 1950.

On this date in 1929, Yuma Mesa Grapefruit Co. announced it would erect a $25,000 packing house in Yuma and the Bomberger Seed Co. would construct a $10,000 warehouse and seed laboratory.

Arizona History – May 24

Sunday, May 24

On this date in 1869, John Wesley Powell and his party began their historic exploration of the Colorado River.

On this date in 1915, Arizona and California celebrated the opening of the new “Ocean to Ocean” highway bridge at Yuma.

On this date in 1925, R.J. Jones of Phoenix, who owned a 160-acre 165-hectare) tract of land located a mile and a half( (2 kilometers) from the Casa Grande ruins, announced that the land would be subdivided and a new town called Coolidge would be built.

On this date in 1930, the State of Arizona presented a bronze statue of John Campbell Greenway to Statuary Hall in Washington, D.C.

 

Arizona History – May 23

Saturday, May 23

On this date in 1868, Col. Christopher “Kit” Carson, who directed the campaign against the Navajos which resulted in their surrender and the exile of about half the tribe to Fort Sumner between 1864 and 1868, died at Fort Lyon, Colorado, just nine days before the June 1 signing of the treaty which allowed the Navajos to return to their homeland.

On this date in 1919, the Secretary of the Arizona Livestock Board reported that Cochise County was swarming with cattle rustlers.

On this date in 1927, one person died and several were injured when two Santa Fe trains crashed near Flagstaff.

Source: Arizona history May 17-23 – Washington Times

Happy Memorial Day weekend to all. While we live in a time where freedom is a distant memory, let us not forget those who fought to keep us as free as possible, and who paid the ultimate price.

Let us celebrate their lives, once again restore freedom and liberty, and throw off the heavy yoke of corrupt government.

Arizona History – May 19

Tuesday, May 19

On this date in 1890, The Arizona Republican published its first issue and would become the Arizona Republic 40 years later.

On this date on 1892, a stage coach line was established between Flagstaff and the Grand Canyon.

On this date in 1916, private citizens of Arizona let the contract for a solid silver service to be presented to the battleship Arizona. The price was approximately $8,000.

Source: Arizona history May 17-23 – Washington Times

Sat, May 19, 1917 – Page 1 · Arizona Daily Star (Tucson, Arizona) · Newspapers.com

Arizona History – May 18

1910: John Gardner, Pima County census enumerator, reports that as he entered a Yaquai village in northern Pima County all the Indians quickly vanished. His total count for the village was one female.

1929: Federal Engineer H.J. Gault arrives in Yuma to begin the final survey of the All-American Canal.

2004: Randy Johnson of the Arizona Diamondbacks pitches a perfect game, beating the Braves 2-0, in Atlanta. It was the 17th perfect game in Major League Baseball history, and Johnson — at age 40 — was the oldest pitcher to pitch a perfect game.

Source: May 18: Today in Arizona history | Local news | tucson.com