Category Archives: Arizona

A homeless man wandered into Kingman one day, here’s what happened

For years, the white-bearded man in the red Santa Claus outfit has been a familiar sight around this isolated high-desert town, his habits so routine people take notice when he’s not there.In triple-digit August heat and on frosty January mornings, he pushes an overloaded cart along congested Stockton Hill Road, his companion toy rabbit riding shotgun, trundling unsteadily between his haunts at supermarkets, fast-food joints and coffeehouses.Who is this character, this man in scarlet, people once asked. Is he homeless? Does he have substance or emotional issues? He seemed harmless, because not once did anyone see him stick out his hand to beg, bother or steal.Eventually, some stopped to introduce themselves. James Zyla, as he calls himself, greeted them in a charming British accent uncommon to rural Arizona. His last name, he said, rhymed with sarsaparilla, a lovely word he’d once used in a poem and decided to imitate. For starters, he’d say, he didn’t like the terms “homeless” or “living on the streets,” and much preferred “on the road.”

Source: A homeless man wandered in one day, and this Arizona town adopted him – Los Angeles Times

Frequent Visitors

Today, we’ll step away from the birds, and look at some other desert creatures that seem to thrive in this ever-changing, and sometimes rather hostile environment.

Coyotes:

We hear them pretty much daily, and sometimes get a glimpse. The leave their scat around the ranch from time to time.

We leave them alone, but the local ranchers here treat them as pests. They do love your pets, so it’s best to be wary. Coyotes are sneaky, they’ll send one to lure your dog, while four more are waiting to trap and corner them. Watch out!

They seem to be fat and happy in the moist years, but scrawny in the drier years, as one would expect. This year, I imagine they are quite happy, as we’re seeing an abundance of rabbits.

Rabbits:

Speaking of rabbits, they really are prolific this year. They’re cute and cuddly when they’re little, but soon they’re eating everything.

The snakes, coyotes, bobcats & Mountain Lions all eat them.

Waiting for a Rabbit snack…

Snakes:

We have a variety here, including some of the deadly kind.

There’s a lot more, but time is short today, so we’ll leave it at that for now.

 

 

Land Special of the Week – 19165 S Gold Mine

Update: Sold!

Well, that was quick. Told you it was great value!

Wow! Every once in a while, a really good value appears at Stagecoach Trails. It’s even nicer when it’s our own listing.

This week’s Special of the Week is a brand new listing at 19165 South Goldmine Rd. (Stagecoach Trails Parcel 7) offered at just $49,900. What makes this is amazing value is not just the prime location east of Alamo Rd., but this parcel already has an existing septic system and well. It’s practically turn key for your RV, or to start building that dream off grid home.

Continue reading Land Special of the Week – 19165 S Gold Mine

This Month in Arizona – 1997

Here’s an article about the mysterious lights spotted in 1997 in Arizona:

Phoenix Lights – 1997 The Phoenix Lights (sometimes called the “Lights over Phoenix”) were a series of widely sighted unidentified flying objects observed in the skies over Arizona, Nevada in the United States, and Sonora, Mexico on Thursday, March 13, 1997.Lights of varying descriptions were seen by thousands of people between 19:30 and 22:30 MST, in a space of about 300 miles (480 km), from the Nevada line, through Phoenix, to the edge of Tucson.  There were allegedly two distinct events involved in the incident: a triangular formation of lights seen to pass over the state, and a series of stationary lights seen in the Phoenix area. The United States Air Force identified the second group of lights as flares dropped by A-10 Warthog aircraft that were on training exercises at the Barry Goldwater Range in southwest Arizona.Witnesses claim to have observed a huge carpenter’s square-shaped UFO, containing five spherical lights or possibly light-emitting engines. Fife Symington, the governor at the time, was one witness to this incident; he later called the object “otherworldly.”The lights were reported to have reappeared in 2007 and 2008, but these events were quickly attributed to (respectively) military flares dropped by fighter aircraft at Luke Air Force Base and flares attached to helium balloons released by a civilian.

Source: Phoenix Lights – 1997 – MUFON (Click to read More)

Saturday Week Highlights

It was a busy week with a lot of clients and running around. It feels like I’ve been by all of the 130,000 acres at Stagecoach Trails.

Meanwhile, we ended up listing seven different properties in the Yucca area, and there’s some real beauties in the bunch.

There’s something for every price range, and a wide variety of properties either closer to town, or snuggled up by the mountains.

So don’t wait to buy land, buy land and wait…

Today, it’s been a little quieter, and I’m grateful. There are so many ranch chores that need my attention. Little by little I’m finishing those “must do’s” and getting caught up on gardening too.

Today was battery maintenance day where I clean all of the terminals on my 28 golf cart batteries (T-105s,) and check to make sure that every cell (3 to every battery) is full of distilled water. It’s pretty time consuming, but vital to battery life.

The weather is delightful, that time between the chill of winter, and the blazing heat of June. We’re loving it!

 

 

Land Special of the Week – 450 Kit Carson

Update : 6/19/19 SOLD!

Owner will consider financing with a reasonable down.

Make an offer!

This weeks’ gem is Stagecoach Trails Parcel 450. It’s on Kit Carson Road between Shadow Lane & Red Cloud Rd.

It’s real beauty with spectacular views, and it’s just loaded with lush high desert vegetation. At just $17,900, it’s a smokin deal.

It’s off the beaten path enough to be super private, yet close to primary roads for easier access to Kingman or Lake Havasu City.

We’ve been busy here folks. It’s not too late to take advantage of the best prices in the last twenty five years, but soon it just might be. I’m not kidding, I’ve seen what happens when people realize how beautiful it is here. They tell their friends… Everywhere else prices have risen, we suddenly are a real “true value.”

 

Click to see more pictures

Continue reading Land Special of the Week – 450 Kit Carson

Frequent Visitors

It’s the time of year when out here on the ranch we start paying close attention to where we’re putting our feet.

It’s with good reason, as the desert has a host of things that want to bite or sting you, so it’s best to take heed.

A frequent visitor is the Western Diamondback. Usually not a super aggressive snake, you sure don’t want to step on one.

Years ago, I walked down to the garden first thing. On the way back not a few minutes later, in that morning reverie one can have before the coffee kicks in, I came less than 6 inches from stepping on a four footer. I was definitely awake after that, and so was the snake.

Continue reading Frequent Visitors

Wildflower Season Soon

It’s been a wet year so far. Today we received a light rain. On top of the rains of January & February and the upcoming rain on Friday, we are looking at what may be a rather good wildflower season.

In a perfect year, we would receive a decent soaking at least every two weeks from September to March. In most years, this just doesn’t happen, and this year was no exception.

We did get some decent rains in October, but November and most of December were devoid of any rain. There’s still hope though, and the relatively moist run that we’ve so far this season will really help this year. (At least one can dream.)

In 2005, we had a particularly wet year. The groundwater was so abundant that water ran across Alamo Rd. in spots for months. There were “seasonal” streams that had been dry for years that suddenly became babbling brooks. It was a verdant green time, and the desert was simply splendid.

Will 2019 be another stunner? Time will tell

 

 

Are We Losing the Grand Canyon?

“IF YOU BREAK loose here, you can’t stop. You’re going into the abyss,” barks Rich Rudow. Normally he is unflappable, but as he knows too well, this is no place to let down one’s guard. We’re on a cliff roughly 3,500 feet above the Colorado River at the tip of the Great Thumb Mesa, a spectacular formation that thrusts out from the South Rim of the Grand Canyon like the bow of an immense ship. It is one of the canyon’s most remote spots, rarely seen even by the most hard-core backpackers. If you come this far out on the Thumb, there is no way to get down to the river without climbing gear, and the dwindling food in your pack won’t allow you to make the eight-day trek back the way you came. You have to move forward.

Click the link to read the whole article, including pictures.

Source: Are We Losing the Grand Canyon? Via National Geographic