Arizona History – October 23rd

Friday, October 23rd

On this date in 1775, the expedition under command of Juan Bautista de Anza left Tubac to open a land route to California.

On this date in 1863, General Orders No. 27, dated at Santa Fe, N.M., established a new military department called the District of Northern Arizona.

On this date in 1882, seven notorious criminals escaped from the Pima County Jail in Tucson.

On this date in 1907, newspapers announced there had been six murders in Graham County in one month.

On this date in 1919, the city of Tucson placed cigar boxes on street corners as depositories for contributions to the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Fund, and Col. James McClintock, noted Arizona historian, complained about “undignified methods.”

On this date in 1920, Ralph Cameron, candidate for Congress, suggested that the Colorado River Indian Reservation be given to ex-servicemen.

On this date in 1921, cattle rustling became so common in the Salt River Valley that cattlemen decided to “shoot (rustlers) where they stood and leave them where they fall.”

On this date in 1927, thousands gathered in Mesa to attend four-day ceremonies dedicating the new Mormon temple.

On this date in 1927, the University of Arizona dedicated its new $450,000 library building and boasted of the 60,000 volumes in its stacks.

On this date in 1933, Jack Smith, Coconino County pioneer and last surviving Civil War veteran in Flagstaff, died at the age of 85. A spring in the San Francisco Mountains, which provided the main water supply for Flagstaff, was named for him.

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